Been in Tassie!

Don’t shoot me, Louise – I didn’t have your address and we wouldn’t have had time to catch up even if I did – but I did think of you while in Hobart on the weekend.

The uncharacteristic silence on the blog was due to a five day holiday in what they Tassies like to call “The South Island” of Australia (the rest of us being on “The North Island”). We had $20 tickets on Tiger Airways, and travelled from Launceston to Oatlands (staying in a B&B called “Oatlands Lodge” built in 1837 – a year before my ancestors arrived in Australia), then to Hobart (where we stayed with Cathy’s cousin and her family), then to Port Arthur and winding our way up the East Coast back to Launceston. An exhausting trip – it takes a couple of hours to travel 100ks on Tasmanian roads – but exhilerating for us and educational for the kids.

While in Hobart, we went to Mass at the Church of the Holy Spirit in Sandy Bay. It is Fr Michael Tate’s parish – but unfortunately he was away for the weekend. It seems that this ex-Senator and Hawke Government minister is doing good things there – there appears to be a lot of WYD follow up and even a Latin Mass once a month.

Of course, Cathy and I pigged out on the historical churches. Unfortunately, I have to say that St David’s Anglican Cathedral wins hands down over St Mary’s Catholic Cathedral. In Oatlands we got to see one of only two Pugin designed churches (the other is also in Tassie), but unfortunately it was locked. And in Hobart, we met and chatted with the Rector of St George’s Anglican Church, a beautifully preserved Georgian building, complete with box pews.

Unfortunately, we didn’t escape the football madness. How were we to know that the Premier team were special favourites of the inhabitants of the South Island?

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11 Comments

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11 responses to “Been in Tassie!

  1. Louise

    Aaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhhhh!

    How did you know I’d want to shoot you? Huh?

    Well, next time you come down you’ll *have* to drop in on us. I won’t let you get away with it next time.

    An exhausting trip – it takes a couple of hours to travel 100ks on Tasmanian roads

    I’m glad you noticed this. I always wondered why it seems such a drag just to go up to the other end of the state, or even just the East Coast when we think nothing of travelling 500km or so on the North Island. I thought it was just the result of being on an island and my sense of distance shrinking.

  2. Schütz

    Humble penance being done here, Louise, for this dreadful ommission. Next time, I promise.

    Are you visiting the North Island any time soon?

  3. Tony

    There is a more ‘European’ sense of space in Tassie IMO — I visited there for the first time at the beginning of the year — in that there’s lots going on within a short distance.

    A couple of years ago we spent some time in Pt Augusta and we lived in a house quite close to ‘the track’ – the road that leads North to … ultimately Darwin. That sense of space is awesome compared to smaller — geographically smaller that is — states.

    An even better way to appreciate it is to ‘do the Nullabor’ and experience horizons as ‘far as the eye can see’ unfettered by flora or geography or anything human made.

    But I did love Tassie!

  4. Louise

    There is a more ‘European’ sense of space in Tassie IMO — I visited there for the first time at the beginning of the year — in that there’s lots going on within a short distance.

    I think that sums it up pretty well, Tony, although our beaches are mercifully patronised in relatively low numbers, unlike Europe.

  5. Louise

    And you know, David, I sometimes go to Holy Spirit parish, so we could have seen you there if I’d known!

    (I feel so rejected. *sniff*)

    Anyway, as it happens we are heading up to Canberra next Wednesday for a week and have stop-overs in Melbourne (I think). Although I suspect we’ll be there during work hours or so.

  6. Schütz

    I feel reeeeaaaaal bad, Lou (tail between legs). I won’t do it again. Promise.

    Re Tassie Beaches – our girls loved them. The water was so clear and aqua blue and the sand so white it could have been Far North Queensland.

    But for the fact that it was 13 degrees in the sun.

  7. Therese

    Tasmania is one of my favourite holiday memories.

    I remember Mt. Wellington had snow and my husband loved playing in it. I stayed in the car. It was way too cold for me.

  8. Schütz

    Apparently they don’t let you up there in your car any more if there is snow on top. Too dangerous, apparently. It discouraged us. We made do with Mt Nelson instead.

  9. Joshua

    DAVID!!!

    Don’t tell lies – I’m Tasmanian, and I can tell you that NO ONE calls Tas the “South Island” and the rest of Australia the “North Island”: you’re playing silly buggers.

    Instead, everyone calls the rest of the nation “The Mainland”, which can have a vaguely pejorative sense, in the same way that Western Australians refer to the rest of the continent as “the East” or “the Eastern States” – with the implication that bad people are doing bad things against us over there…

  10. Louise

    Re Tassie Beaches – our girls loved them. The water was so clear and aqua blue and the sand so white it could have been Far North Queensland.

    But for the fact that it was 13 degrees in the sun.

    Hehehe.

    I’m Tasmanian, and I can tell you that NO ONE calls Tas the “South Island” and the rest of Australia the “North Island”

    Actually, Joshua, I do that, but possibly only because we lived on the mainland for so long.

    Long enough to lose our second heads, anyway.

  11. Joshua

    I stand corrected in your instance – but it is the exception that proves the rule.